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Interactive Gateway Dance

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Curricula

The Interactive Gateway curriculum is designed for High School students and consists of 8 comprehensive lessons plans exploring the art and culture of the 1960s. In the lessons, students learn about 1960s choreographers Yvonne Rainer, Steve Paxton, Deborah Hay, Trisha Brown, Merce Cunningham, Anna Halprin and their choreographic devices. Students will improvise and choreograph dances structured by chance methods, sports, games, political issues, surroundings, everyday gestures and the manipulation of objects. Through these investigations students realize that in the 1960s, dance was redefined to include everyday people, everyday movement, indeterminacy, and alternative spaces.

Teachers may adapt the Interactive Gateway curriculum as is necessary based on their students interests and school schedules. For teachers interested in using the curriculum, a Teachers Guide consisting of additional literature, teaching notes, historical synopsis, 1960s music and performance and process DVDs is available. To receive the Interactive Gateway Teachers Guide contact Dr. Mila Parrish at MilaLParrish@gmail.com

Lesson One: Jump if you Feel Like It

Unit of Study: Interactive Gateway

Theme: Creating A Community

Sub theme: Circle Dances by Deborah Hay

Grades: 9-12th grade

Materials: CD player and music

The very first day where we working on Deborah Hay circle dances, you were first describing what we were doing, well you know just bouncing wit the music and if I feel like jumping, just go on ahead and then hop, step, step, hop. It sounded so simple to me and I was shocked at how great it felt.

- Missy Bischoff

Brief Description of the Lesson:

Students are introduced to the decade of the 1960s as a distinctive social, political and artistic period. Choreographer, performer and author Deborah Hay is profiled and excerpts of her book, Moving through the Universe in Bare Feet: Ten Circle Dances for Everyone, are shared. Students learn three of Hay's Circle Dances and discuss the communal experience. Students further investigate cooperation through the participation of a series of activities that require group sensitivity. Students then compare 1960s social dances, music, and approaches to movement with todays dance scenes (weddings, raves, proms, etc.). In small groups students then create a Circle Dance reflecting contemporary themes and perform them for the class.

 

Learning Outcomes:

Upon the completion of the lesson, the students will be able to:

demonstrate a basic knowledge of the 1960s demonstrate an awareness of Postmodern dance and how Circle Dances were used as a creative structure by Deborah Hay, Anna Halprin, and others perform 3 authentic Circle Dances to music build friendships and trust between dancers create their own Circle Dances share their Circle Dances and observe and assess their peers in discussion

 

The Lesson:

Introduction:

a.) Discussion: Sitting in a circle, the students respond to the following question, What ideas and events do you associate with the 1960s?" Once the students have shared their ideas the teacher may need to fill in missing information. Key ideas:

Vietnam War Civil Rights Movement Space Walk Peace movement demonstrations Assassinations of John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Robert Kennedy Freedom/Liberation Peace Equality

b.) Next, the teacher introduces the choreographers of the Judson Dance Theater by sharing their mandate in breaking the old rules. The old rules included the use of technically trained dancers, proscenium/ formal performance stages, narrative dances/expressionism, and spectacle. The Judson Dance Theater choreographers were more interested in the movement of untrained dancers, alternative spaces for performance, non-narrative dance, and pedestrian task-like non-technical movement. Prompted by the instructor, students offer examples of this from their reading of Three Dances of the 60s, an excerpt from Time and the Dancing Image by Deborah Jowitt (Reading #1).

c.) The students then discuss how the historical associations (listed earlier) may have influenced the Judson Dance Theater choreographers in their choices.

d.) In a lecture, students are introduced to Deborah Hay and her philosophy of dance, as well as her choreographic study creating Circle Dances. Students discuss the handout on Deborah Hays Philosophy of Cellular Consciousness (Appendix B).

 

Movement Exploration #1: Circle Dances

Music:

"Wooden Ships" by Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young

"Midnight Hour" or "Funky Broadway" by Wilson Pickett

"Let's Stay Together" by Al Green

a.) The instructor leads the students in 3 Circle Dances taken from Moving Through The Universe In Bare Feet: 10 Circle dances for everyone by Deborah Hay and Donna Jean Rogers (Appendix C). The students follow the instructors directives and demonstrations in performing 3 of Deborah Hays Circle Dances to their original music.

b.) Afterwards, the students discuss their reactions to the Circle Dances commenting on their effect on the group.

Movement Exploration #2: Communication Activity

a.) Flocking: Dancers are divided into small groups and put into diamond formations. The students follow the movements of the person at the point in the direction they are facing, much like how birds flock. The lead person will move slowly so that everyone can follow along, being conscious of the direction they are facing. When the dancers turned to face a new direction the leadership role is shifted to the dancer at the point of the new direction. This activity continues until the leadership role has been shifted to all dancers.

b.) Mirroring across floor: Dancers pair off, with one student the leader and the other person the follower. The leader is told to move from low to high levels across the floor, exploring different speeds and moving their bodies in new ways. The aim of this activity is for the students to develop sensitivity to the movement of their partner. The students will, without talking, switch the role of leader and follower. At any point the follower can assert themselves and take over the leadership role.

c.) Partner conversation: Dancers find a new partner and investigate moving with their partner using the principle of action/reaction. Students move across the floor focusing on each other and responding in a conversation of movement while traveling through the space.

Dance Making:

a.) In a small group, students work collaboratively to create their own Circle Dance. The students Circle Dances reflect contemporary values in movement and musical choices.

b.) Each group shares their contemporary Circle Dances and the class provides meaningful feedback to each group.

 

Closure/Reflection:

a.) Student Reflection #1: In their journals, students answer the question Write your own definition of dance.

Assessment Strategies/Related Activities:

In the discussion, were students comments thoughtful and reflective of Three Dances from the 60s (Reading #1)? Did the students performance of Deborah Hays Circle Dances and the communication activities demonstrate group trust and developing friendships? Did the students Circle Dance reflect contemporary dance scene? In Assignment #1, were the students notes on the movies or TV episodes concrete examples of the sixties?

 

Preparation for this Lesson:

Reading Assignment #1: Three Dances from the Sixties, an excerpt from Time and the Dancing Image by Deborah Hay. Website: Students visit the Interactive Gateway Website. Assignment #1: Students watch a movie (i.e.- Forrest Gump, Platoon, Good Morning Vietnam, Mississippi Burning) or 2-3 episodes of a television show (i.e.- That Seventies Show, American Dream) that is set in the sixties/seventies and take notes. Look for distinctive examples of social, political, style, food, entertainment, music, art aspects.

 

Lesson Resources:

Deborah Hays Philosophy of Cellular Consciousness, an Interactive Gateway Handout, quoted from Lamb at the Alter written by Deborah Hay (Appendix B Moving Through the Universe in Bare Feet: 10 Circle dances for everyone by Deborah Hay and Donna Jean Rogers (Appendix C)

 

Homework:

Homework Assignment #2: Observe an everyday scene for 10 minutes. The scene must include people interacting with each other (i.e. - the grocery store, a restaurant, a park) and record the actions of the people. Reading Assignment #2: For Lesson #2, students read The Dancing, an excerpt from Time and the Dancing Image by Deborah Jowitt.

References:

Banes, Sally. Writing Dancing in the Age of Postmodernism. Hanover: Wesleyan University Press, 1994.

Foster, Susan Leigh. Reading Dancing. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1986.

Hay, Deborah. Lamb at the Altar: The Story of a Dance. North Carolina: Duke University Press, 1994.

Hay, Deborah, Donna Jean Rogers. Moving through the Universe in Bare Feet: 10 circle dance of everybody. Chicago: Swallow Press, 1975.

Hay, Deborah. My body, the Buddhist. Hanover: Wesleyan University Press, 2000.

Jowitt, Deborah. Time and the Dancing Image. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988.

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Appendix B

Deborah Hays Philosophy of cellular consciousness.

And when the dances disappear

And there is just you

Youll be in touch

Not with the movement of your form in Space

But of the movement of the atoms & molecules of which you are made and that surround you...

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Appendix C: Circle Dances 1-3

Circle Dance #1

Music: Wooden Ships by Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young

Everyone Standing in a Circle

Stomach & Knees Relaxed...Feel the Circle

Breathe your arms simultaneously in front of you to overhead and float

them down again to rest position..in your own time.

Feel the Air on your wrists

Under your arms. Every time you raise their armsits new.

Float your arms through Space.....

Everyone in circle

Standing with your hands on hips

Move head from facing right to facing left one time.

A Shaft of Light from your forehead illuminating space before you.

Lighting something youve never seen before.

Holding hands in Circle

Bouncing very gently in the knees

Constant, Even motion

Feel long, wide and relaxed in torso.

Bring air to your waist and spine.

Standing together in a circle holding hands

Step-Kick to rhythm

Be come together through energy.......

Arms at rest--------

Head moves continuously without stopping

Small, slow movements but full of breath

Rest of body is relaxed and still.

Outside of skull sensitive to particles of space around it....

Circle Dance #2

Music: Lets Stay Together by Al Green

In a circle, bouncing in RhythmJump if you feel like it

Everything is Effortless

Standing

Holding hands at sides

Knees relaxed and swaying

Step Step Step Hopping

Do your own thing in place

In a big circle, walking in long open strides

Walk into the footsteps of the person just in front of you. . . . .

Circle Dance #3

Music: Funky Broadway or Midnight Hour by Wilson Pickett

Running in place in a large circle

If you want to leave your spot and run around the inside of the circle one time

Return to your place on the perimeter before making another circle

Slow Motion Walk

Holding Hands to the Center of the Circle

Follow the leader

Step step step hop

Step step step hop

Travelling in circle

Relaxed and earthward

Follow the leader

Facing in Circle_ Step Step Step Hop

From side to side

Sliding second step over to the first

Place whole foot flat

Down on floor

Knees relaxed_

Energy down

Holding hands, keep Circle as Wide as possible

Step step step hop

Step step step hop

Step step step hop

Step step step hop

Etc.

Step step step hop

Traveling in Circle

Holding Hands

Steps get gradually smaller

til we are moving in place

begin moving Backward

and reverse the action

until we move forward again___

Lesson Two: A Closer Look

Unit of Study: Interactive Gateway

Theme: Redefining dance

Sub theme: Everyday Dances

Grades: 9-12th grade

Materials: CD player and music

“I think something that will always stick in my mind was the exercise where we had to stare at each other for long as we could without moving. It made me look at things in a different way. I often find myself staring out the window or looking at a tree and I think I look at it completely different now because I notice the little minor details that I didn’t notice.”

- Sarah Ventre

Brief Description of the Lesson:

Students learn to find dance in everyday life by observing an ordinary scene at their school (i.e.-people working at a desk, studying, or eating lunch) looking for the elements of design, dynamics, spatial elements, and music. With this information the students create an everyday dance. To conclude the lesson, students reflect on how looking closer at every day movement challenges their definition of dance.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon the completion of the lesson, students will be able to:

analyze every day movement in school and describe what is seen create a dance based on their observations define and demonstrate everyday movements and everyday dances" re-define dance and address how analysis of everyday movement challenges preconceived notions of dance

The Lesson:

Introduction

a.) Discussion: The students are asked to define dance and identify its elements. The instructor explains how the Judson Dance Theater choreographers found their inspiration through observations of life. Furthermore they were interested in re-defining dance to include everyday movement of all people. Students offer examples of this from the reading of The Dancing, an excerpt from Time and the Dancing Image by Deborah Jowitt (Reading #2).

Observation: Everyday Dances

a.) Students divide into small groups and look around the school in search of a "dance," for example: students waiting in line, students looking for a book in a library, or pedestrians walking by. Students watch the dance for at least 5 minutes. Each student in the group takes notes addressing a different aspect of the performance such as the physical shapes that were made, the use of the space, the movement, the dynamics, the design elements, and the music. Each group is given an Everyday Worksheet (Appendix D) to help guide the students in the recording of their observations.

Dance Making

a.) Each student observer shares their analysis with their group. One member compiles a group observation list for later discussion and dance making.

b.) Students create an Everyday Dance based on the group observation list. The guidelines for the Everyday Dances include:

2-3 dynamics changes at least 8 everyday movements elements of repetition and rhythmic patterning at least 5 different group formations a clear beginning, middle and end a developing theme

Sharing

a.) Students share their Everyday Dances for the class. After each showing students reflect on the groups performance, dance choices, and the theme.

Movement Exploration #1:

a.) Call and Response: The class divides into small groups of 4-5 and arrange in lines.

Part 1: Students line up facing the back of the person in front of them. The first person turns to the second and makes eye contact. Once the second feels they have made adequate (approximately 2 minutes) eye contact they turn to the third person. This repeats on down the line. Part 2: The first person turns to the second and performs an everyday movement that the second then copies back. Next, the second student turns to the third and performs a different everyday movement that the third person then copies back. This repeats on down the line.

 

Closure/ Reflection:

a.) Student Reflection #2: Students answer the following question, Has todays lesson, changed your perception and/or feeling about dance? How?

 

Assessment Strategies/Related Activities:

Did the students Everyday Dances reflect their observations of everyday activities? Did the students dance making demonstrate the students ability to find, describe, analyze, and perform an "everyday dance" with everyday movement? In their journals, did the students reflect upon their Everyday Dances and how they challenged their definition of dance?

 

Preparation for this Lesson:

Reading Assignment #2: The Dancing, an excerpt from Time and the Dancing Image by Deborah Jowitt. Students turn in Homework Assignment #2.

 

Lesson Resources:

Everyday Dances Worksheet (Appendix D)

 

Homework:

Homework Assignment #3: For Lesson #3, bring in a dice and a pedestrian movement (i.e.-scratching, or tying a shoe, or picking up something). Reading Assignment #3: For Lesson #3, students read Merce Cunningham and Chance Methods, Interactive Gateway handout.

 

References:

Adshead-Lansdale, Janet. Choreography: Principles and Practice. Guildford: University of Surrey: National Resource Centre for Dance, 1987.

Jowitt, Deborah. Time and the Dancing Image. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988.

 

Appendix D: EVERYDAY DANCES

With your group find a location where people are congregated. Watch the people in this location for 10 minutes.

Individually take notes about what you see - these notes will be compiled when you return to the class. Look carefully and closely and provide as much detail as possible. Consider the following:

What dance elements do you see?

How is the body used?

Describe the performance area.

What types of movements are used?

Identify the movement qualities.

What do you notice about the lights, costumes, and props? Is there any accompaniment or music? What does it sound like?

Compare notes with your group.

Lesson One: Jump if you Feel Like It

Unit of Study: Interactive Gateway

Theme: Chance Dance

Sub theme: Alternative Methods

for Choreography

Grades: 9-12th grade

Materials: CD player, music, dice, cut-up words about the 60s in a paper bag

I loved the “chance dances” and I didn’t mind giving up some of my control as a choreo-grapher because wonderful, uncertain things happened in our “chance dances”- things that I would have never have had the brilliancy to choreography. Chance makes choreography more unique.”

- Sara Anderson

Brief Description of the Lesson:

This workshop exposes students to chance choreographic procedures that came out of the Postmodern movement. Students use Merce Cunninghams chance method of rolling a dice to reorder a dance phrase and to find multiple variations. The students compare this choreographic method to traditional methods, taking into account the advantages and challenges experienced.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon the completion of the lesson, students will be able to:

demonstrate an awareness of how the chance procedures alter choreography and recognize chance leaders such as Merce Cunningham, Yvonne Rainer, and Steve Paxton perform a movement phrase and then reorder it with chance methods share their Chance Dances with the class and observe and evaluate them reflect on the advantages and disadvantages of using chance methods and discuss how it could be applied in choreography today

 

The Lesson:

Introduction/Discussion:

a.) Cunningham and Chance: In a discussion led by the instructor the students talk about Merce Cunningham and Chance Methods (Reading #3). Students consider what other methods could produce chance besides using dice or coins. Finally, students discuss the possible uses of chance methods in their own choreography.

Movement Exploration #1: Chance Phrase

a.) With the guidance of the instructor, students develop a 6-part movement phrase consisting of pedestrian movements such as walking, tying a shoe, scratching, picking up something.

b.) After the 6-part phrase is complete then the instructor numbers the movements 1-6 and the class learns the phrase.

c.) Individually, each student uses chance methods to create a new order for their phrase.

d.) The students perform the new sequence several times until it is memorized.

e.) In small groups, students perform their Chance Dance. Afterwards, students discuss how chance opens up the choreographic structure and how it affects the choreographer and performer.

Movement Exploration #2: Call and Response

a.) The students are divided into two groups, the callers and the responders. The callers are taken just outside the dance room so that they cant see the responders. All together the responders perform their Chance Dance, repeating the sequence until the instructor brings it to a close.

b.) Meanwhile, each caller is designated a number from 1-6, which they call out at any time. When the performers hear a number called they stop performing the movement they were doing and perform the movement assigned to the number called and when complete they go back where their sequence left off. The callers must be sensitive not to calls out their number at the same time.

c.) The instructor ends the dance and the students switch roles and repeat the movement exploration. This activity can be repeated with the callers sitting in the audience.

d.) Sitting in a circle, students discuss the effects of chance and how it influenced the performance.

Closure: Discussion and Reflection

a.) Student Reflection #3: Students reflect and answer the following question, When a choreographer uses chance, he or she must give up some control. How do you feel about letting go of personal preferences when making a dance?

Assessment Strategies

Did the students 6-part movement phrase movement reflect pedestrian movement? Did the students use Merce Cunninghams Chance Method to individually re-order the 6-part movement phrase? Did the students perform their Chance Dances with confidence and were they able to respond quickly to the cues of the callers in Movement Exploration #2? In their journal, did the students reflect on their experience with Chance Dance and the choreography possibilities?

Preparation for this Lesson:

Reading Assignment #3: Students read Merce Cunningham and Chance Methods, Interactive Gateway handout. Students turn in Assignment #3.

 

Homework:

Homework Assignment #4: Cut-up Phrase Homework: (Before this class the students would have watched a movie about the 60s and based on their viewing write a list of words that characterize the 1960s. Then the students use scissors to cut up each word and put them in a bag.) Students create a cut-up phrase by drawing 6 words out of the bag and piece the words together on a sheet of paper in an order.

Reading Assignment #4: For Lesson #4, students read Yvonne Rainers Bio on the Interactive Gateway Website and The Object, an excerpt from Time and the Dancing Image by Deborah Jowitt. Students need to bring in a pillow for Lesson #4.

References:

Adshead-Lansdale, Janet. Choreography: Principles and Practice. Guildford: University of Surrey: National Resource Centre for Dance, 1987.

Vaughan, David. Newshour with Jim Lehrer, America Masters. PBS website.

Lesson Four: Just Pass It

Unit of Study: Interactive Gateway

Theme: Props

Sub theme: Tasks

Grades: 9-12th grade

Materials: CD player, music, word list, scissors,

basket, a large box, pillows (students can supply their own),

1 folding chair per student, large boxes

It was really fresh and new for me to actually just pick up a pillow and sit it on my lap instead of trying to do some fancy spin and just do it like a natural action. I realized that was more interesting."

- Carrie Le Baron

Brief Description of the Lesson:

In this lesson the students are introduced to choreographer Yvonne Rainer, a founding member of the Judson Dance Theater. Students view Chair/Pillow (1973), listen to the performance notes, and learn about the meaning of the work by Yvonne Rainer. In Chair/Pillow Yvonne Rainer investigated minimalist dance using two props (a chair and a pillow). Students explore passing a prop from one person to the next person in a task-like manner. These movement explorations require students to develop group communication, focus, and problem solving skills.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon the completion of the lesson, students will be able to:

demonstrate different ways to transfer a prop both stationary and while moving through space move together as a group with a prop, while solving a movement problem make individual movement choices while remaining focused, aware and connected to a group

 

The Lesson:

Introduction

a.) Sharing of cut-up poems: In small groups, students share their cut-up poems and discuss the effects the element of chance had on this activity.

b.) Discussion: Students view interviews by Yvonne Rainer and Pat Catterson discussing the work of Chair/Pillow and the period of time. Then students read an interview of Anna Halprin by Yvonne Rainer regarding tasks (Appendix E).

Movement Exploration #1: Transferring a Prop

a.) Transferring a Prop: Students divide into three groups and create three lines. A prop (box, pillow, or basket) is handed out to the head of each line. The dancers transfer the prop to the dancer behind them without affective dancey quality. The students are instructed to consider the props characteristics focusing on the elements of weight, space and relationship. Students transfer their prop down the line and back up again with functional quality.

b.) Collectively Transferring a Prop: Students divide into three groups and each group is given a large box and a problem to solve while moving from spot A to spot B in the room. Problems to solve include: transferring a prop without using hands, transferring a prop with everyone connected to it all times using different body parts, and transferring a prop with eyes closed.

c.) Sharing Transferring a Prop: Each group shares their solution.

d.) Discussion: The instructor leads a group discussion on the issues each group faced when solving the problem.

Movement Exploration #3: Chairs and Pillows

a.) Each student gets a chair and a pillow. Students are instructed to explore the physical characteristics of the two objects without being dancey. Students should explore the objects in a matter of fact way focusing on the elements of weight, space, and relationship. Students examine all the ways they can sit in the chair, move the chair, rest on the pillow, use the pillow, and move the pillow.

b.) Students create a list of at least three different functional activities utilizing the chair and pillow.

c.) Students perform their three functional activities for their peers and students give feedback.

d.) Students view Yvonne Rainers Chair/Pillow on the Interactive Gateway Website and then consider the different ways Yvonne Rainer used the chairs and pillows in functional ways.

 

Closure: Discussion

a.) The students discuss The Object, an excerpt taken from Time and the Dancing Image by Deborah Jowitt (Reading #4). The students offer examples of how Judson Dance Theater choreographers define the types of props that were used. Students also discuss the challenges they faced in using the props in a matter of fact manner.

b.) Student Reflection #4: Students write the following reflection, Define the following words as they relate to Postmodern dance:

task prop focus fuction

 

Assessment Strategies:

Did students find functional ways to explore a box, basket, chair and pillow? Did students collaborate with peers to solve a movement problem involving the transference of a prop? Did students cut-up poem demonstrate another method of chance?

 

Preparation for this Lesson:

Reading Assignment #4: Students read The Object, an excerpt from Time and the Dancing Image by Deborah Jowitt and read Yvonne Rainers Bio on the Interactive Gateway Website. Students turn in Assignment #4.

Lesson Resources:

Tasks, an excerpt from Yvonne Rainer Interviews Anna Halprin edited by Michael Kirby (Appendix E)

Homework:

Homework Assignment #5: Find one item at home (strainer, luggage, utility box) and write a paragraph describing the objects characteristics (weight, space, and relationship to other objects) and how these characteristics contribute to the manipulation of the item. Write a summary on how they could use the item in future choreography. Students need to bring in a sports photo to class for Lesson #5.

References:

Interactive Gateway Website. Yvonne Rainers Bio.

Jowitt, Deborah. Time and the Dancing Image. Berkely: University of California Press, 1988.

Schechner, R, Kirby, M (eds). Rainer, Yvonne: Interviews Anna Halprin. Tulane Drama Review Vol No 2 (special issue), 1965.

Lesson Five: Life is a Game

Unit of Study: Interactive Gateway

Theme: Redefining Dance To Include Athletic Structures

Sub theme: Conflict of Struggle and Peace

Grades: 9-12th grade

Materials: CD player and music, sports photos, Twister

What I think I have learned the most about the post modern time is that everyone was invited. That it wasn’t just about dancers or ballerinas of you know these people who have al the experience, but it was the everyday person, that does everyday things.

- Lona Lee

Brief Description of the Lesson:

This workshops focus is to familiarize students with the Postmodern choreographic methods of creating dances from sports and game structures. Students investigate customary movements associated with sports such as baseball and basketball (swing, toss, and pass), as well as explore inventive ways to abstract sports movement. Drawing from real sports each group formulates a new sport and creates a new Sports Dance. Following the Sports Dance the class explores the use of game structures used as choreographic approaches in the dance making process. The class examines themes of struggle, which defines the 1960s and includes the issues of Feminism, Vietnam, and Civil Rights.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon the completion of the lesson, students will be able to:

identify the characteristics and strategies involved in sports and game structures employ sports and game structures as choreographic tools share their Sports Dances with the class and observe and assess their peers create movement studies based on the metaphor of struggle

 

The Lesson:

Introduction

a.) Discussion: Students discuss Everyday Bodies (Reading #5), an excerpt from Time and the Dancing Image by Deborah Jowitt. The instructor then discusses how Judson Dance Theater choreographers were particularly interested in athletes bodies and movements. Through the reading of a handout, the instructor introduces the methods of sports and game structures used as choreographic approaches in the 1960s. (Appendix F).

b.) Baseball and basketball: The class forms a circle and executes imitative movement based on sports. The instructor begins by instructing the students to focus on baseball. Students close their eyes and envision what the game of baseball looks like, the movement qualities, the shapes, the level and speed of both the pitcher and hitter. Once the students have visualized, the instructor executes a baseball movement (i.e.-swing, throw, pitch, and catch) and the class echoes the movement. Then moving around the circle, students perform a different baseball movement and the class mimics it. This continues about half way around the class. Then, the students repeat the visualization activity thinking about the game of basketball and the activity continues around the circle this time performing basketball movements (i.e.-dribble, shoot, pass, and slam dunk).

c.) Abstraction: The class performs the sports movements again and are encouraged to abstract the movement either by using a different body part, or performing the action with a different rhythm, or changing the spatial relationship of the movement by making it either much larger or much smaller.

Movement Exploration #1: Sports Dances:

a.) Sports Study: The class is divided into three groups. In their groups, students share their homework assignment (to bring in a sports photo). Each group analyzes their sports photos using the following guidelines (Appendix G):

essential movement dynamics and the structure of the event how the group connects/interacts use of space (court, field, park, diamond, etc.), use of objects (ball, bat, club, etc.)

Based on their analysis of the sports photo, each group creates a new inventive, imaginary sport.

b.) Sports Dance Sharing: Each group shares their dance study with the class. After the sharing, the students compare the studies in a discussion.

Movement Exploration #2: Game Structures: Twister the game of Struggle:

a.) Twister Demo: The class examines the game Twister. Then the class divides into small groups and writes about the characteristics and strategies involved in the game Twister. The class discusses these characteristics and how they could be used as a metaphor for struggle in the 1960s.

b.) Twister Demo in Small Groups: In small groups, students investigate Twister as a metaphor for struggle in the issues of: Feminism, Vietnam, or Civil Rights. Each group makes a list of political events and quotes related to their topic (i.e.- love not war, down with the draft, peace). The students are asked to consider the opposing conflicts that create the struggle. The students create an issue dance based on their list. The dances must include:

a conflict that develops elements of opposition shapes and movement that represents struggle an ending, either a resolution or confrontation

c.) Twister Sharing: Each group shares their Twister dance with the class and each group explains how they connected their topic with the game structure.

Closure/Reflection:

a.) In a discussion led by the instructor, the students reflect on how the sports dances and game structures open up new possibilities in dance.

b.) Student Reflection #5: Students answer the following question, Discuss the process of working with sports movement and game structures as a basis for both choreography and performance.

Assessment Strategies:

Did the students use the analysis of their sports photo to create an abstracted Sports Dance? Were students able to create a dance as a metaphor for struggle? Did the students journal writing reflect their experience of dance generated from game structures and did they discuss how this opens new possibilities in choreography?

Preparation for this Lesson:

Reading Assignment #5: Students read Everyday Bodies, an excerpt from Time and the Dancing Image by Deborah Jowitt. Students turn in Assignment #6.

Lesson Resources:

Sports Movement and Game Structures, an Interactive Gateway handout (Appendix F) Sports Worksheet (Appendix G)

Homework:

Homework Assignment #6: For Lesson #6, students read the historic timeline on the Interactive Gateway Website.

References:

Banes, Sally. Writing Dancing in the Age of Postmodernism. Hanover: Wesleyan University Press, 1994.

Jowitt, Deborah. Time and the Dancing Image. Berkeley: University of California Press,

1988.

Appendix G: Sports Choreographic Study

Name Your Sport:

Complimentary Opposition

_____________________________________________________

1. What are the essential movements of your sport?

2. What are the dynamics of the sport and the structure of the event?

3. How do the players connect and interact?

4. What is location and formation of space? (court, field, park, diamond, etc.)

5. What objects are used and how are they used? (ball, bat, club, etc.)

Lesson Six: Speak Out!

Unit of Study: Interactive Gateway

Theme: Issue Dances

Sub theme: Feminism, Vietnam, And Civil Rights

Grades: 9-12th grade

Materials: CD player, music, pens, paper, images and text on the 1960s

“An aspect of this project that has been most rewarding is the building of historical content. Often dancers learn repertory but merely dabble on where it comes from, what it stands for or even why it was explored. By doing research, reading books, looking at pictures and brainstorming each of us are given the chance to understand a time in history.

- Lona Lee

Brief Description of the Lesson:

Students learn about Yvonne Rainers Trio A, which was considered a dance of the people. Students then continue working on their struggle dances (began in the previous lesson). Struggle dances are based on prevalent issues from the 1960s (i.e. Feminism, Vietnam, and Civil Rights). To help develop their dances, students conduct research on the issues and employ their choice from the choreographic structures investigated in previous lessons. The purpose of this lesson is to empower students to express their concerns about real world issues within their own choreography.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon the completion of the lesson, students will be able to:

identify the main factors of 1960s issues such as: Feminism, Vietnam, and Civil Rights demonstrate their ability to revise and add on to a dance originating from the analyses of struggle demonstrate their ability to create movement studies collaboratively share their dances with the class and observe and assess their peers in discussion

The Lesson:

Introduction

a.) The instructor reminds the students about the political and social events, activist groups and peaceful protests that occurred in the 1960s. The instructor describes how the Judson Dance Theater choreographers used their art as a method of activism. An example of this was Yvonne Rainers Trio A where the minimalist nature of the work, and its conflict in dynamics, signified it as the dance of the people. Trio A was once performed with the dancers wearing only the American Flag around their neck in opposition to the Vietnam War.

Movement Exploration #1: Issue Dances

a.) In their groups, the students review their dances from the previous lesson.

b.) The groups conduct additional research on their topics using books and articles on the 1960s. Students organize their research by creating a concept web map with the main issue in the center of the page and related research stemming out from the main issue.

Using the concept web map the students revise and add on to their dance investigations. The students expand upon the original guidelines, but now they must incorporate ideas, images, and text found in their research. The final dance should be an issue dance that makes a clear, strong, statement that provokes the audience to consider all the elements of the issue. Student dances must include:

a conflict that develops elements of opposition shapes and abstract movement that represents struggle an ending, either a resolution or confrontation use of text, images, and ideas that identify the specific issue The students may use any of the choreographic strategies investigated in this unit

c.) Once the groups have completed their issue based movement study, the three pieces are combined (facilitated by the instructor) to create a class dance encompassing all three issues.

d.) Issue dances are then shared with another class.

Closure: Discuss

a.) Students reflect on this approach to choreography as opposed to other methods and discuss how dance can be used as a means of expression.

b.) Student Reflection #6: Students reflect on the lesson and answer the following question, How did this method of choreography empower you as a choreographer and activists?

Assessment Strategies:

Did the students use their research on issues of Feminism, Civil Rights, and Vietnam to create their dance? Did the students issue dances project a strong clear protest statement about their issue? Were the students reflections thoughtful and address how dance can be used as a powerful means of expression to make a statement about political/social issues?

Preparation for this Lesson:

Reading Assignment #6: Students review the history timeline on the Interactive Gateway Website. Students participate in the previous lesson on Twister as a metaphor for struggle.

 

Homework:

Reading Assignment #7: For Lesson #7, students read the article on Happenings. Homework Assignment 7: Choose an issue that that is relevant in todays society and that you are passionate about and describe a choreographic structure that could be used to make your statement for your issue.

References:

Interactive Gateway Website: Historic TimeLine and Scrapbook

Lesson Seven: Anytime, Anywhere, Anything

Unit of Study: Interactive Gateway

Theme: Redefining Dance As Happening Anytime, Anywhere, Including Any Movement

Sub theme: Happenings

Grades: 9-12th grade

Materials: CD player, music, a new space to dance

“I like how aware of the space around me I have become. I am much more aware of the stage as well as the dancers around me because of this experience. I’ve also learned how to better dance with others as a group as opposed to dancing as an individual.”

- Lona Lee

Brief Description of the Lesson:

This lesson focuses on environmental dances and specifically the Happenings of the 1960s. Students read and discuss a short article on Happenings. Students investigate a new space (environment) and then use this investigation to build an improvisational structure for their own Happening. Through the participation in a Happening, students experience the 1960s concept that dance which can happen anywhere, anytime, and include any movement.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon the completion of the lesson, students will be able to:

demonstrate multiple solutions when creating a Happening create a Happening that reflects the environment selected demonstrate an awareness of Judson Dance Theater choreographers definition of dance which could happen anytime, anywhere, and include any movement

The Lesson:

Introduction

a.) Introduction: The instructor engages students in a short discussion on Space, an excerpt from Time and the Dancing Image by Deborah Jowitt (Reading #7). Then the teacher hands out two articles about Happenings (Appendix H and Appendix I), which the students read. The students discuss why Happenings (in art, theater, music, and dance) were created and their purposes.

Movement Exploration #1: A Happening

a.) Environment Examination: The class takes a field trip in the school. Students discuss what details about the space stand out immediately, then they examine more intimately the design, dimension, levels, and surfaces of the space.

b.) Self-exploration: Each student moves around the new space, exploring their environment and its possibilities for a Happening. The class is encouraged to use the space, sit on the furniture (if there is any), and contemplate choreographic ideas involving space.

c.) Creating a Happening: The class forms two groups. Students discuss their findings from the self-exploration and then brainstorm the structure and theme for their Happening. An example of a structure might be to move all the chairs in a classroom into a new configuration (sideways, backwards, on top and right side up around the classroom) or plotting a traffic-jam on the stairwell. Each group then executes their Happening in the space while the other group watches.

Closure/Reflection:

a.) Student Reflection #7: Students reflect on the lesson and answer the following question, Write about your experience in todays lesson, focusing on how the space supports the re-definition of where dance can happen and when dance can occur. If todays workshop changes your definition of dance then revise your definition of dance to include todays concepts.

Assessment Strategies:

Did the students Happening reflect a theme and reflect the environment selected? Did the students written reflection address the concept of dance being performed at any time, anywhere, and include any movement? Did this experience change any of the students definition of dance?

Preparation for this Lesson:

Students turn in Assignment #8. Reading Assignment #7: Students read Spaces, an excerpt from Time and the Dancing Image by Derborah Jowitt.

Lesson Resources:

Happenings, an Interactive Gateway handout (Appendix H) What Happens at a Happenings? an article written by Jack Anderson (Appendix I)

Homework:

Reading Assignment #8: For Lesson #8, students need to read an article about Anna Halprin. Homework Assignment #8: Choose a location either that youve seen or imaged, that you think would be an interesting place to perform. Explain how you would use the environment to structure the choreographic composition.

References:

Anderson, Jack. What happens at a Happening?. Dance Magazine: August 1966.

Jowitt, Deborah. Time and the Dancing Image. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988.

Law, Lisa. A Visual Journey: Photos 1965-1971.

Schneemn,Carolee. Ladies with Attitude: Tactics and Strategies of the Womens Movement.

Lesson Eight: Planet Dance

Unit of Study: Interactive Gateway

Theme: Site Specific Dances

Sub theme: Dance Reflecting Nature

Grades: 9-12th grade

Materials: CD player, music, outdoor location

“I like how aware of the space around me I have become. I am much more aware of the stage as well as the dancers around me because of this experience. I’ve also learned how to better dance with others as a group as opposed to dancing as an individual.”

- Rachel Ryan

Brief Description of the Lesson:

Students continue their exploration in alternative spaces for dance. In this lesson students create an outdoor site-specific work. The class discusses Anna Halprins philosophies on nature and dance and perform one of Anna Halprins Planet Dances. Then, the students go outside and find an environment that inspires them to create a dance based on the natural design, dimension, levels, surface, texture, line, structure, and atmosphere of the location.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon the completion of the lesson, students will be able to:

demonstrate their ability to perform a Planet Dance created by Anna Halprin demonstrate an understanding of Anna Halprins philosophies of the use of dance to heal the body and as a response to natures beauty create a site specific that reflects the nature and physical elements of the environment selected

The Lesson:

Introduction

a.) The instructor discusses Anna Halprins philosophies, choreographic message, and impact on dance in the 1960s and today (Reading #8).

Movement Exploration #1: Planet Dances

a.) The instructor guides the students through one of Anna Halprins Planet Dances using the Planetary Score handout (Appendix J). As the students perform the Planet Dance the instructor reads a poem (Appendix K). Afterwards the students discuss some of the emotions and feelings they experienced while performing the dances and their thoughts on dance as a form of therapy.

Movement Exploration #2: Site Specific

a.) Environment Examination: The class is divided into three groups. The groups then explore the campus and find a site that inspires them to create a dance based on the environments design, dimension, levels, surfaces, textures, structures, and atmosphere. Students are encouraged to attend to the wind, sky, sun and trees as they move in the environment.

b.) Creating a Site Specific Work: The students have about twenty minutes to work.

c.) Showing: Then the class travels to each site to watch everyones site-specific work. The students discuss their experience and compare the various approaches to the same assignment.

Closure/Reflection:

a.) Student Reflection #8: Students write a reflection about this experience and answer the question, How has this investigation into alternative spaces, everyday movement, and props changed your perception of dance?

Assessment Strategies:

After learning Anna Halprins Planet Dance, were students able to discuss her philosophies on the relationship of dance, therapy, and nature? Did students work collaboratively to create their own site-specific work and did students make choreographic choices that reflected the nature and the design of the environment? Did students homework assignment demonstrate their ability to imagine using a new alternative space for dance?

Preparation for this Lesson:

Reading Assignment #9: Students read Anna Halprins Bio and philosophies. Students turn in Assignment #8.

Lesson Resources:

Planet Dance Score, an Interactive Gateway handout (Appendix J) Commitment a poem from the World Peace Society Website by Ariella Shira (Appendix K)

References:

Halprin, Anna. Stinson, Allen. Circle the Earth Manual. 1987.

Shira, Ariella. Commitment. World Peace Soceity.

Women Environmental Directory. Anna Halrpin.

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